Posts tagged: Justice

Fear and the Loss of Compassion

By Darrell Yoder on December 21, 2015

It's Christmas, and millions of people are on edge. Those living in the Middle East are familiar with this fear, but it's new (or at least more intense) for many of us. We've watched with horror as ISIS fighters commit atrocities and export their violence to Africa, Paris and (perhaps indirectly) San Bernardino. We hear about the growing domestic threat in the US.

With everything coming closer to…

Most Likely, Least Likely

By Brittany Stichter on February 26, 2016

This week in chapel, Jennifer Greer began by playing a game with the chapel community. She asked questions like "Are you most or least likely to ride a roller coaster?" and "Are you most or least likely to eat liver?" Through her message, she shared how Jesus often chooses the least likely to use in big ways. When Jesus healed the ten lepers in Luke 17:11-19, only one came back to Jesus. The only leper…

Responding to the Opioid Epidemic and Shortage of Addictions Counselors

By Catherine Mueller-Bell on March 14, 2016

Last month, NPR ran a story about the opioid (e.g., heroin) epidemic and the shortage of addiction counselors to respond to the problem. New Hampshire had been in the news as having an acute addiction crisis with politicians calling for more treatment options. It's good news that addiction and the need for treatment are getting attention (although we should acknowledge the tragedy that communities…

Spanking: A Father's Perspective

By Darrell Yoder on March 28, 2016

In my own experience, spanking has at times seemed effective, and at other times it has failed miserably. There are times I may have used spanking too quickly, as a first choice in punishment, without considering other options, only to later wonder if it really was the best method. This was even more pronounced when my children didn't respond to spanking in the way I thought they would.

What Does Christian Parenting Look Like?

By Catherine Mueller-Bell on March 30, 2016

So, what does this look like day-to-day when one is parenting a biological or adopted child or caring for a child in an orphanage, foster home, or correctional facility, or reaching out to children who are homeless? I would recommend that our best example is how Jesus treated children, and I invite you to investigate this issue with me.

To Spank or Not to Spank

By Catherine Mueller-Bell on April 4, 2016

One of the most common challenges for parents is deciding how to respond when a child misbehaves. Caregivers who are parenting don't always agree; they each bring their own experiences and assumptions and have to work out what they will do in their own family. As we explore this issue from a Christian Worldview, I would suggest that the Word of God from the Christian Bible is our greatest resource…

Intercultural Lecture Series: Pastor Kizombo Kalumbula Casts Vision for True Compassion in Grand Rapids

By Andrew Kischner on October 26, 2016

During his lecture, Kizombo Kalumbula identified what many in Grand Rapids already understand—that Grand Rapids delivers a Garden-of-Eden-esque existence for some while others do not experience the same benefits. For some, Grand Rapids defines 'family-friendly'; for others, it is, economically, one of the worst places to raise a family.* At the same time, Grand Rapids is ranked among the most charitable…

What Does Compassion Really Look Like? (Part 1 of 2)

By Kizombo Kalumbula on June 6, 2016

In January 2015, Forbes Magazine published an article, "The cities where African-Americans are doing the best economically." My city, Grand Rapids, Michigan, ranked 51st out of the 52 largest cities in America—second to last. Then in October, the Huffington Post, published another article ranking Grand Rapids 5th among the top 10 worst cities for Black Americans to live. It's hard to be Black in Grand…

What Does Compassion Really Look Like? Part 2: A Compassion Revolution

By Kizombo Kalumbula on June 13, 2016

In my last post I closed with two questions. First, could there be more true compassion going on in Grand Rapids than what meets the eye? Second, could it be that God is beginning to do something new in my city? There seems to be a paradox playing out here. On the one hand, Grand Rapids is ranked 51st out of the 52 largest cities in America where African Americans are doing the best economically, and…

Influential Graduates

By Joe Stowell on October 18, 2013

I recently visited one of our graduates in jail. He's been there quite a while and no doubt will be there for years to come.

His name is Craig Curtis, and he is the chaplain at the E.C. Brooks Correctional Facility in Muskegon, Michigan. Guys like Craig are my heroes! His work at the prison has been phenomenal, and last week I had the profound privilege of worshipping with Craig and 137 inmates at…

A Heart for Justice

By Bailie Rouse on September 15, 2017

Last week, Dr. John Hilber continued the theme of justice with his sermon entitled "Heart for Justice," by exploring Psalm 101, a psalm of David. In his message, Dr. Hilber emphasized that David drives straight to the heart of the matter—justice and mercy demand that an individual's character be aligned and committed to the Lord.

Rejected by the Accepted

By Bailie Rouse on September 22, 2017

Last week in chapel, Jennifer Greer brought us a message based on Luke 4:14-30. In this passage, Jesus traveled to Nazareth, his hometown, and as was his custom, Jesus went to the synagogue on the Sabbath to speak. Jesus picked up the scroll, and he began to read from the prophet Isaiah (Isaiah 61:1-2 and Isaiah 58:6). Upon doing so, Jesus proclaimed that the scripture had been fulfilled and that this…

Mercy Not Sacrifice

By Bailie Rouse on October 6, 2017

This week, Dr. Mariano Avila concentrated the chapel message around the attribute of mercy. He stressed that mercy is the "main medicine" Jesus gave his people to receive true healing. Jesus is our example of how to live in a way that is according to the will of God, and the Gospels show us how to live as Jesus lived. In Matthew 9:13 Jesus refers to Hosea 6:6, and he stresses that God desires mercy…

Jesus on Justice

By Bailie Rouse on October 20, 2017

Last week in chapel, Rev. Dr. Howard Earle preached out of Luke 4:14-21 on the topic of Jesus on Justice. He reminded us that the Spirit of the Lord empowered Jesus to carry out specific activities for the benefit and justice of people. Christ released captives and healed the blind and the deaf not for his own celebrity but in order to be in relationship with people.

The Spirit comes to empower us…

Prayer with a Regard to Justice

By Bailie Rouse on October 13, 2017

In chapel this week, Dr. Tim Gombis spoke about the importance of prayer with a regard to justice. In Ephesians 4:20-24, Paul reminds believers that we are to put off the old self and be renewed in the Spirit to put on the new self. This new self is created after the likeness of the Lord's righteousness and justice. As believers we participate in an ongoing dynamic of righteousness, and we must take…

Reformation Chapel

By Bailie Rouse on October 27, 2017

In this week's chapel, Dr. Wittmer recognized the celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation. Dr. Wittmer asked the same question Luther did 500 years ago: "How can I a miserable sinner pass God's judgment," and there is only one answer. By grace alone, by faith alone, and in Christ alone can we receive salvation. His main texts include Colossians 2:9-10 and Colossians 3:23-24. Check out…

Love of the Other

By Bailie Rouse on November 3, 2017

During chapel this week, Rev. Kate Kooyman encouraged students to think about what the "love of the other" or Christian hospitality looks like tangibly. She taught from the text Luke 10:30-37, the parable of the Good Samaritan. Check out the full teaching below.

Remaining in Christ

By Bailie Rouse on November 10, 2017

This week in Chapel, Dr. Joy Bonnema spoke on how producing fruit occurs when an individual remains in Christ, and this remaining happens through love. Often as Christians, we often forget the importance of remaining or abiding in Christ. If we abide in Him, then God will call us into a deeper understanding and a more personal experience of His love. Dr. Bonnema's main texts include John 15:1-17 and…

Responding to Persistent Structural Injustice

By Bailie Rouse on December 1, 2017

During chapel this week, Dr. Rebecca DeYoung shared two stories of individuals who have experienced persistent injustice. First she shared a story of her friend Douglas, who has been wrongly convicted and is living in the prison system. Despite the hardship of living in what seems like exile, Douglas chooses to trust God by persisting and living in victory and in peace. Then, Dr. DeYoung taught from…

When Sex Is an Idol, Holiness and Justice Are Both at Stake

By Jo Anna Kelly on December 4, 2017

During the fourth session of the GRTS Talking Points event, we heard from Matt Krieg, licensed therapist and director of Caring Well Counseling. Matt and his wife Laurie travel the world doing what many of us would never dream of doing, and yet they do it with humility and a heart for service. Both Matt and Laurie discuss their respective stories of broken sexuality and the way God has worked in their…

The Bottom Line

By Bailie Rouse on December 7, 2017

This week in chapel, Dr. Denyes asked the question of what is the bottom line for believers. He expounded upon the theme verse Micah 6:8 as a reminder that believers are called to act justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with God. As Christ followers, we cannot only pity those who are suffering from injustice in the world. We must respond and take action. William E. Gladstone once said, "Justice delayed…

Follow Jesus in the LGBT+ Conversation

By Darrell Yoder on December 14, 2017

For the last several weeks, we have been recapping the Fall 2017 conference on "Loving LGBT+ People with the Gospel." If you missed the previous recap posts, you can check out sessions one, two, three and four.

Today, I want to give a few highlights from the final session of the conference—a panel discussion with Dr. Preston Sprinkle, Laurie Krieg, Matt Krieg, Pastor Marvin Williams and Dr. Gerald…

A Call to Action

By Bailie Rouse on February 2, 2018

The theme for chapel this semester is "A Call to Action." This week, Dr. Tim Gombis urged us to return to the biblical text, in order to be guided to do the things Jesus has called us to do.

In the Gospel of Mark, two warnings are woven throughout the text. First, "be wary of ballpark Gospels," and, secondly, "take no comfort in Christian symbols." Contrary to what our culture says, as followers of…

Why Wait?

By Bailie Rouse on February 9, 2018

This week in chapel, Dr. Kenneth Reid asked the question, "why wait?" Jesus gave His disciples the great commission, but in Luke 24:45-49, He tells them to wait. They needed the Holy Spirit. It was essential that they wait for the Holy Spirit to come upon them, in order that they would be given divine enablement to fulfill the tasks God had for them.

Today, though, followers of Christ do not have…

Hope is an Action Word

By Bailie Rouse on February 15, 2018

As Pastor Joe Lane began his message this week, he emphasized that first as Christ followers, we have a call to mobilization. As leaders in ministry, there must be a sense of urgency placed on our hearts and minds about living out the gospel and serving others.

Secondly, we have a call to hope. Hope is possibility. Pastor Lane used Romans 8:22-25 as a reminder that hope that is seeing, is not a hope…

The Power of the Spirit + the Boldness of Believers

By Bailie Rouse on February 22, 2018

This week in chapel, Pastor Christy Lipscomb spoke on the essential need of receiving the power of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit is the one who empowers us and enlivens us for the mission of the Kingdom of God. Her key texts were Acts 1:7-8 and Joel 2:28-29.

Pastor Lipscomb emphasized six ways the church is impacted when the Holy Spirit gives power and when believers respond in obedient boldness…

The Responsibility of Being a Witness

By Bailie Rouse on March 22, 2018

This week in chapel, Dr. Evans preached about our responsibility as believers to be a witness of Christ and to attest to the truth of the Gospel. As Isaiah cried out to the Lord to "send me," we should have the same level of conviction. We should no longer be spectators, but we are required to become an active participant and witness for the Gospel. Dr. Evans emphasized that a witness is not silent…

Christ-like Humility

By Bailie Rouse on March 23, 2018

This week in chapel, Jeff Lash preached a message on how we should seek to be humble as Christ is humble. Each day the media and culture bombard us with the notion that we must promote ourselves and put ourselves above others. Jeff showed from Philippians 2:1-11 that Jesus humbled Himself by becoming obedient to death­—even death on a cross. As Christ gave Himself up for His church, we as followers…

Serving in the Possible, Trusting the Impossible to God

By Ana Cruz on March 28, 2018

Editor's Note: Today, we've asked Ana Cruz, a GRTS counseling student, to share about her experience serving in her home country, Honduras, coming to the US, and leading others to continue serving. She offers a story of trust, simple obedience and God's faithfulness in hardship. She also offers an opportunity for others to join her and the team in Honduras this summer, July 2018. Prayerfully consider…

Marvin Williams: "Submitting Our Biases to Lord Jesus"

By Andrew Kischner on March 30, 2018

Editor's Note: Over the next two weeks, we are featuring several messages from Cornerstone University's undergrad chapel, which engage the topics of justice, race, reconciliation and love (listen to all CU chapel messages here). Today's message is by Marvin Williams, lead pastor at Trinity Church, Lansing, Mich. With each message, we've provided a "Talking Points Takeaway" as a point of reflection…

Kenneth Russell: "When Revelation Hits the Road"

By Andrew Kischner on March 29, 2018

Editor's Note: Over the next two weeks, we are featuring several messages from Cornerstone University's undergrad chapel, which engage the topics of justice, race, reconciliation and love (listen to all CU chapel messages here). Today's message is by Kenneth Russell, director of diversity and multicultural affairs at CU. With each message, we've provided a "Talking Points Takeaway" as a point of reflection…

When is Tension a Good Thing? (Reflections on King's Letter from Birmingham Jail, Part 1)

By Jordan Grooters on April 2, 2018

Editor's Note: This week marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., civil rights activist, minister and spokesperson for nonviolent activism. He was killed on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tenn., but his legacy lives on today. As we prepare for our series on Justice + Unity: Toward the Healing of a Fractured Church, two Cornerstone University staff members, Jordan…

Brothers and Sisters Who Do Nothing (Reflections on King’s Letter from Birmingham Jail, Part 2)

By Jordan Grooters on April 4, 2018

Editor's Note: This week marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., civil rights activist, minister and spokesperson for nonviolent activism. He was killed on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tenn., but his legacy lives on today. As we prepare for our series on Justice + Unity: Toward the Healing of a Fractured Church, two Cornerstone University staff members, Jordan…

Trillia Newbell: “Humility and Race”

By Andrew Kischner on April 6, 2018

Editor's Note: Over the last two weeks, we are featuring several messages from Cornerstone University's undergrad chapel, which engage the topics of justice, race, reconciliation and love (listen to all CU chapel messages here). Today's message is by Trillia Newbell, Director of Community Outreach for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission for the Southern Baptist Convention. With each message…

Christina Edmondson: "Luke 19: An Act of Restorative Justice and the Response of the Exploited"

By Andrew Kischner on April 5, 2018

Editor's Note: Over the last two weeks, we are featuring several messages from Cornerstone University's undergrad chapel, which engage the topics of justice, race, reconciliation and love (listen to all CU chapel messages here). Today's message is by Christina Edmondson, Dean of Intercultural Student Development at Calvin College. With each message, we've provided a “Talking Points Takeaway” as a point…

A Compass Orientation

By Bailie Rouse on April 6, 2018

This week in Chapel Dr. Hilber preached from Habakkuk 1, in which the prophet is complaining to the Lord and anguishing over the injustice that is caused by the Babylonian people. As the conversation between Habakkuk and God continues, God reminds Habakkuk that the righteous person will live by his faithfulness, which is bound together by fearing God with a whole heart. Our life should be oriented…

Hope of the Resurrection

By Bailie Rouse on March 30, 2018

This week in chapel, Pastor Kizombo Kalumbula preached from the scripture 1 Corinthians 15:1-21 to emphasize the hope found in the resurrection of Jesus Christ our Lord and because Christ rose from the grave, we can trust that God will also raise our bodies after death. Without the truth of the resurrection, our Christian faith would be hopeless. Pastor Kalumbula taught that there are grave consequences…

Got Any Neighbors?

By Joe Stowell on August 7, 2018

Recently at Cornerstone we held a Talking Points event focused on the theme of justice and unity. We had a good turnout with insightful teaching and a panel discussion about issues that tend to divide the body of Christ.

Our Conversation on Justice + Unity Continues October 2

By Darrell Yoder on September 17, 2018

Last spring, we started a three-part conference series on the theme "Justice + Unity: Toward the Healing of a Fractured Church." On Oct. 2, we will pick up where we left off and this time focus on Hispanic/Latino(a) experiences and perspectives regarding justice and unity. As I wrote previously, the biblical concept of justice and righteousness can be crystalized into two main ideas: "care for the…

Immigration, Hospitality and Love of Neighbor

By Darrell Yoder on September 19, 2018

Our upcoming conference on Justice + Unity, focusing on the experience of Hispanic/Latino(a) Christians in the United States, raises important questions. When we first introduced this series, a number of people came up to me, looked carefully to their left and then to their right, and asked quietly, "Are you going to talk about immigration?" Each time, the urgency in their voices was clear. How can…

Radical Justice: Dr. Peter Osborn on CU's Efforts in Accessible Education

By Dennis Graham on November 6, 2018

"At Cornerstone, we don't just provide education; we actively remove barriers that keep others from experiencing that education."

Within two minutes of sitting down with Dr. Peter Osborn, vice president for adult learning, you gain a palpable sense of his passion for accessible education.

And with the forthcoming launch of a new program partnership with Mel Trotter Ministries, Cornerstone is advancing…

True Religion: Athletic Director Chip Huber Shares About CU's Partnership With the Jubilee Centre

By Dave Emerson on November 9, 2018

Zambia. Soccer. And Bono.

Not the first three things you might pair in the name of justice, but for Chip Huber, Cornerstone's director of athletics and associate vice president for student development, the three are inseparable from the call God has placed in his heart to seek justice.

Let's start with Bono.

It was 2002 on the campus of Wheaton College when Bono spoke to the HIV crisis in sub-Saharan…

That I May See: Director of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs Kenneth Russell on Justice

By Dave Emerson on November 19, 2018

Justice.

For many, the word "justice" fits within very specific confines: often tied to a court of law or an explicit people group.

We think of justice as arbitration—"these people are guilty." Or, "this child is innocent."

We don't think of justice as a vital aspect of our core identity.

What's more, we often actively resist the notion that injustice exists as an inherent bias within our being…

Is Your Vision for Women Big (and Biblical) Enough?

By Darrell Yoder on March 4, 2019

On April 16, we will conclude a year-long journey on the theme "Justice + Unity: Toward the Healing of a Fractured Church." What an amazing year! We have heard some amazing speakers and had phenomenal conversations about the issues that fracture the church in our country. We've engaged these conversations on-stage and off-stage, and we have hosted (or participated in) luncheons/dinners where leaders…