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Create Without Ceasing

Grand Rapids Theological SeminaryShow God's Love and Care
for the World Through Your Work

Everyday Works Curriculum

Many followers of Jesus struggle to see their work in this way—as a place of worship and mission for the kingdom of God. It’s time to change that. It’s time to rethink what you do every day and why it matters … for the kingdom.

About the Curriculum

Everyday Works is a four-part curriculum that seeks to help Christians rethink the meaning and purpose of their everyday work in the kingdom of Jesus Christ. It is the culmination of a two-year project by Grand Rapids Theological Seminary. We brought leading teachers and authors together to explore how “secular” work really is a means of worship, discipleship and mission.

The Everyday Works Curriculum is designed with small groups in mind and features inspiring intro videos, full-length presentations, video clips for group discussion, a study guide and a pile of “extras” to take your learning deeper. Through generous donor support, the entire curriculum is available here at no cost.

Contents

Here is how the study works. The material is broken down into four parts. Each part has five short videos with 1-2 discussion questions. The study guide provides additional discussion questions, summarizes key ideas from the presentations and provides space for taking notes.

In the guide, a visual layout shows how the pieces and topics of the Everyday Works curriculum fit together. Each lightbulb represents a video clip in the study that you can watch individually or with a group. Make your way through each clip at your own pace, and use the layout to track your progress.

This Everyday Works curriculum project would not have been possible without the contributions of numerous friends and partners. We offer a special thank you to the Kern Family Foundation for their generous partnership on this project.

Download the Study Guide

Jump To:

Part 1: Work Is Good

Intro Video: "Doesn't This Change Everything?" With George Moss

In this video, George Moss expresses a tension many people feel between their faith and their everyday work. This intro video sets up the theme “Work is Good,” which you will explore in video clips 1-4.

Reflect and Discuss

In Genesis, we read that God created the world, and it was good in His eyes. Did this change when Adam and Eve sinned and work became toil? The Apostle John wrote that “God so loved the world” that He sent His Son to save it, but He also said that we must “not love the world” (John 3:16; 1 John 2:15). This can be confusing. The word “worldly” has negative connotations, but we all know the joy of early pleasures like good food and a job well done.

Heavenly purpose and earthly pleasure go together. This is critical for seeing earthly things like work the way God sees them. God actually wants us to enjoy His good creation and to understand that even work is a gift from Him. He wants us to use His gifts for His glory and for the common good of everyone around us.

What is your “everyday work,” including the paid and unpaid tasks you do day-in and day-out? Identify the two things that consume most of your time. Would you say you enjoy these things, or are they more of a necessity?

Video Clip 1: Creation Is Good

In this video clip, Mike Wittmer walks through the story of Scripture, showing that creation is good and that God wants His people to enjoy the gifts He provides. The Bible, like any other book, has a plot, and we need to understand each part of the story in light of the whole thing.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

  • When you hear the word “worldly,” what comes to your mind? How have the ideas discussed by Dr. Wittmer made you rethink your view of “worldly things”?
  • What are some of the “good gifts” in your life, and what are some things that “matter more”? What are some ways you can be tempted to let those good gifts become idols in your life?

Video Clip 2: Creation Is Home

In this video clip, Mike Wittmer shows that humans are created for a physical earth. This is our home, and God wants us to flourish here. But He doesn’t ask us to do it alone. He is with us, redeeming all things and removing all of the effects of sin and evil.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

  • Heaven is not our final goal, but rather a renewed and restored earth with Jesus. How does this make you rethink old assumptions, and what difference could it make for the value of your everyday work?
  • How real does the statement “Jesus is my home” feel to you right now? How might God be inviting you to find your identity and purpose more fully in Jesus Christ?

Video Clip 3: Called to Love and Serve

In this video clip, Mike Wittmer explains that every person in the world has a calling—even several callings. Pastors and missionaries are not the only ones who are called. We are all called to love God more than anything else and to deny ourselves, that is, to set aside our own interests in order to love and serve others.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

  • Reflect on this quote from St. Augustine: “You have made us for Yourself, O Lord, and our hearts are restless until they find their rest in You.” Do you feel this in your own life? Why or why not?
  • Give an example of a time when you denied yourself (set aside your interests for the sake of others). How did it give you a deeper sense of life, meaning or purpose?

Video Clip 4: Called to Work and Rest

In this video clip, Mike Wittmer describes two more callings that every person has. God created each of us to rule over the earth on His behalf. One way we do that is through our everyday work. However, God also calls us to rest and to remember that we are not defined by our work. Our identity is found not in what we do but in who we know.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

  • What are your callings? List as many as possible. Which ones are covenantal, and which are not?
  • How is your occupation a way you can love God, serve your neighbor and contribute to culture and society?

Extras

Enjoy God’s Good World

For more discussion of this material, check out these additional video clips with Dr. Mike Wittmer and other experienced leaders.

 

Work Is a Calling

For more discussion of this material, check out these additional video clips with Dr. Mike Wittmer and other experienced leaders.

Part 2: Live the Kingdom

Intro Video: "You Have More to Offer Than You Think" With George Moss

In this video, George Moss describes how our everyday work can be light and salt to the world. This intro video sets up the theme “Live the Kingdom,” which you will explore in video clips 5-8.

Reflect and Discuss

Jesus said, “By their fruit you will recognize them” (Matthew 7:16). In other words, when you look at someone’s life, you should be able to see things that indicate whether or not they are followers of Jesus. Their faith should be reflected in their actions. What are those things? What sets a Christian apart from the rest of the world? Depending on background and culture, many people will answer those questions differently.

Either way, following Jesus will lead us to live in a uniquely “kingdom” sort of way. We will allow the kingdom of God to change us so that the world gets a taste of God’s love, justice and righteousness.

Describe a time when you saw someone’s behavior and, without the person saying anything about Jesus, you could tell he or she is probably His follower? What characteristics or behaviors tipped you off? What made the individual stand out?

Video Clip 5: Rejoicing the City

In this video clip, Amy Sherman explores the biblical vision of the “righteous” in Scripture. These people see everything they have, not as something they’ve earned for their own benefit, but rather as a gift from God to be stewarded for the common good. They willingly disadvantage themselves to help others flourish—especially the most vulnerable.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect and discuss the following questions with your group.

  • What is the vision of “the righteous” in Proverbs 11:10? How does it compare with what people in your culture usually look for in Christian behavior? What similarities or differences do you see?
  • What kinds of suffering or oppression do people experience where you live? Start close to home, a 10-mile radius, then move out to a radius of 50 and 100 miles. In what ways are Christians involved with addressing injustice?

Video Clip 6: What Does Righteousness Really Look Like?

In this video clip, Amy Sherman describes how becoming “righteous” is a process of spiritual transformation that plays out in three dimensions: upward toward God, inward in our own hearts and outward with others. If we want to take part in God’s mission through our everyday work, we need to start by becoming certain kinds of people.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

  • Which type of righteousness is hardest for you (upward, inward or outward)? What is the biggest obstacle to growing in this type of righteousness, and what can you do to overcome it?
  • Think again about the needs in your community (10-, 50- or 100-mile radius). What are the most crucial needs that people in your vocation may be able to uniquely address?
  • Write down three things that you are doing (or can do) through your work to show God’s love and bring a foretaste of God’s kingdom to others.

Video Clip 7: What is Vocational Stewardship?

In this video clip, Amy Sherman describes “vocational power” and “vocational stewardship.” These concepts will empower any willing person to love God and serve their neighbor through their everyday work. Everyone has certain skills, knowledge, experience and spheres of influence. We just need to identify ours and deploy them for the kingdom.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

Take an inventory of your vocational power. What gifts has God given you to steward for His kingdom? These may be traditional spiritual gifts, but they are also any other asset you have. Brainstorm anything that comes to mind in the seven dimensions of vocational power.

  • Knowledge/Expertise: What do you know and what experience do you have? This can include your job or anything else.
    Platform: What opportunities do you have, large or small, to get a message out or to shine a spotlight on an issue or cause?
  • Networks: What relationships do you have with others who have knowledge and experience that you don’t have?
  • Influence: What ability do you have, whether large or small, to affect change in positive ways?
  • Position: What authority do you have because of your position or title?
  • Skills: What are you good at? These include what you do at your job, but they also include any other skill, gifting or hobby you enjoy.
  • Reputation/Fame: What name recognition do you have and in what circles?

Begin to think creatively and prayerfully about how God might want you to deploy these things intentionally and strategically. Share with your group whatever comes to mind even if you’re not sure yet what to do with it. Video clip 8 will help you brainstorm further.

Video Clip 8: Pathways of Vocational Stewardship

In this video clip, Amy Sherman describes several ways you can leverage your vocational power to serve others. You don’t need to change jobs. You can advance the kingdom right where you are, donate your skills, mentor others, launch new initiatives, etc. With real-world stories, Amy illustrates how to offer your everyday work for real kingdom impact.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

  • Look back at the inventory of vocational power you brainstormed after video clip 7 and think of where God has placed you vocationally (e.g., traditional workplace, self-employed, stay-at-home parent). Which of Dr. Sherman’s “pathways of vocational stewardship” seems the most relevant to you?
  • What is one specific step you can take to push yourself toward action in at least one pathway of vocational stewardship?

Extras

Are You a Tsaddiq?

For more discussion of this material, check out these additional video clips with Amy Sherman and other experienced leaders.

How Do You Live the Kingdom?

For more discussions of this material, check out these additional video clips with Amy Sherman and other experienced leaders.

Part 3: Flourish for Others

Intro Video: "You're Part of Something Huge" With George Moss

In this video, George Moss introduces a concept that is critical for understanding how everyday work serves people and communities in practical ways. This intro video sets up the theme “Flourish for Others,” which you will explore in video clips 9-12.

Reflect and Discuss

We cannot understand the significance of our everyday work, or the opportunity it provides to promote human flourishing, if we don’t see how our work connects with everyone else’s work. In other words, your everyday work is part of something much bigger, the “economy,” and the clearer this becomes th easier it will be to see how God wants to use you to serve people—you may already be serving people you never meet.

In Part 3, Flourish for Others, you will explore what “economy” and “economic activity” really are, using business and businesspeople as examples of how everyday work serves people in life-changing ways. You’ll get behind the numbers and policies of economics to the rub of authentic human behaviors and relationships. And you’ll be able to evaluate how this relates to living out your Christian faith in the world of your everyday work.

What did your parents do for a living when you were a child, and what impact did your parents’ employers have on you and your family? Share one example of this impact, either positive or negative.

Video Clip 9: People Serving People

In this video clip, Rudy Carrasco explains how “economy” and “economics” are more about relationship and ministry then we often think. Economics is about human behavior and the ways we engage with each other. Rudy provides stories of thoughtful business people to illustrate how our everyday work really can help people and cities flourish.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

  • In what way, if at all, does focusing on human relationships change your view of economic activity and working for the kingdom?
  • How do Rudy’s examples of the Mexican cement company and Broetje Orchards illustrate everyday work as a way to promote flourishing? What gifts, skills and motives were needed for those businesspeople to make an impact?

Video 10: What the Bible Says

In this video clip, Rudy Carrasco provides an overview of biblical teaching about economics and God’s intent for human flourishing. God’s people are called to model His righteousness in how we live and work together, including in our everyday work. Jesus demonstrated this as a balance between personal responsibility and concern for people in poverty.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

  • Read Leviticus 19:9-10 and Leviticus 25:25-28. Though our current cultural and economic situation has changed much since the writing of Leviticus, what do these passages tell you about the heart of God in regards to the less fortunate, and how might we apply those principles today?
  • Read Philippians 2:4 and discuss the following statement from the video clip: “Self-interest was not condemned but affirmed and balanced by the concern for others.” How do you balance self-interest (making sure you and your family are taken care of) and proper concern for others? What questions have you wrestled with in navigating this balance, and what helps you?

Video Clip 11: Wrong Decision Makers

In this video clip, Rudy Carrasco provides an example of how economies breakdown and people don’t flourish. When people don’t have the freedom to make decisions, their everyday work is stifled, producing systemic waste and inefficiency. This is true at all levels: government, companies, churches and nonprofit ministries.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

  • In this clip, Rudy gives the negative example of Soviet Russia’s centralized planning and the work of the tolkachi. What is the economic problem, and what does Rudy suggest as the solution? Do you agree or disagree, and why?
  • Why is it important to give individuals freedom to make decisions? What biblical values does this apply, and how does this relate to your everyday work and daily life?

Video Clip 12: Broken Relationships

In this video clip, Rudy Carrasco provides another example of how economies breakdown, this time due to racism and oppression. Everyone is hurt when people or groups of people are cut off from each other. Rudy discusses the life and work of John Perkins, a leader in racial reconciliation and Christian community development.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

  • In this clip, Rudy gives the negative example of racism and prejudice. What is the economic problem, and what does Rudy suggest as the solution? Do you agree or disagree, and why?
  • Do you find discussions of race and racism to be comfortable or uncomfortable? What experiences have you had that shape the way you approach this issue?
  • Review the examples of broken economies in this session: wrong decision makers and broken relationships. When you consider your everyday work and your context, which of these issues do you think you could, in a small way, participate in to bring restoration? What is your next step? Keep it simple and ask God to guide you.

Extras

How Do We Flourish?

For more discussions of this material, check out these additional video clips with Rudy Carrasco and other experienced leaders.

What Keeps Us From Flourishing

For more discussions of this material, check out these additional video clips with Rudy Carrasco and other experienced leaders.

Part 4: Expand the Circle

Intro Video: "We Are Called to Compassion and Justice" With George Moss

In this video, George Moss wrestles with the calling of all Christians to care for people in poverty in a way that honors their dignity as the image of God. No matter what our everyday work is, we all have a potential role to play. This intro video sets up the theme “Expand the Circle,” which you will explore in video clips 13-16.

Reflect and Discuss

The way we think about and treat people in poverty is critical. The Proverbs make this clear: “Whoever oppresses the poor shows contempt for their Maker” (Proverbs 14:31), and “[w]hoever mocks the poor shows contempt for their Maker” (Proverbs 17:5). Active oppression and passive mockery—both of them tell us more about our hearts toward God than anything else.

In Part 4, Artie Lindsay speaks to how we can “expand the circle” at a local level, beginning with our attitude toward poverty. He opens with a biblical foundation for thinking about poverty, evaluates two common views of poverty and considers its causes. He then explores ways we can expand the circle that affirm the dignity of the people we serve.

Identifying with the poor in our communities is not optional or temporary. It is the ongoing calling of the Church. Although this is not a simple step-by-step process, Artie shares the core views and attitudes that will help this take place.

What kind of efforts have you participated in to address poverty at a local level? Describe one experience that was especially impactful in your life.

Video Clip 13: How Do You View Poverty?

In this video clip, Artie Lindsay provides a biblical foundation for thinking about poverty. He evaluates two views that are common but insufficient. The way we view poverty and its causes matters because it shapes how we view potential solutions. We must ask hard questions of ourselves and analyze what values drive our response to poverty.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

At the end of this clip, Pastor Artie invites us to do a simple exercise to discern our attitude toward poverty and people who are poor. Prayerfully complete this exercise and discuss it with your group:

  • Make a list of all the adjectives you have heard or used to describe people who are poor. Do these labels describe the people who are poor you actually know? If you don’t know anyone who is poor, why is that, and how has this session challenged you so far?
  • List reasons why you think people are poor. What does your culture believe are the reasons people are poor?

Video Clip 14: How Will You Approach Poverty?

In this video clip, Artie Lindsay shows that poverty is a relational and spiritual issue—not just a material one. We are all experiencing poverty in some form, and this shared experience provides connection and solidarity. In some ways, we are all the same, so we really can foster relationships of mutual trust and partnership. Pastor Artie offers advice for how to navigate the challenges these relationships always face.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

  • In this clip, Artie Lindsay says that poverty is not only material, but also relational and spiritual. To what extent are you aware of your own poverty, whether material, relational or spiritual? Describe a time when you experienced one or more of these kinds of poverty. What impact did it have on you, and how might that experience help you identify with and relate to people who are poor in other ways?
  • Why is economic and relational exchange always better than one-time or one-way giving? When was a time you gave in a way that was from a posture of superiority, even when you didn’t realize it? When was a time you received in a way that was from a posture of inferiority, questioning your own worth or forgetting your true value? What steps of repentance do you need to take?

Video Clip 15: Our Super Hero Complex

In this video clip, Peter Greer explains how every generation tends to believe that we (people in the West) have the education, skills and intelligence to fix other people’s problems. We don’t, and we end up making our efforts to solve poverty about us rather than about the people we serve or about Jesus Christ Himself.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

  • This video clip calls for honest self-reflection. When was a time you saw, experienced or participated in an effort that was more about the people serving than it was about the people being served or about Jesus Christ? What was the impact?
  • Think about your everyday work. Do you ever take on a “super hero complex”? If so, what usually happens? What usually doesn’t happen?

Video Clip 16: Flip the List! Rethinking Our Approach to International Poverty

In this video clip, Peter Greer proposes an alternative response to international poverty. Humanitarian aid is needed in crises, but if we want to address the root causes of poverty and bring long-term change, we need to focus on employment. This is where lay people can offer skills and expertise from their everyday work to empower others.

Reflect and Discuss

After you watch the video clip, reflect on and discuss the following questions with your group.

  • How did Peter Greer challenge or change your understanding or perspective on humanitarian aid and charity? What questions does it raise?
  • How do you think your everyday work and your vocational power could be used to alleviate poverty around the world? Do you have a particular skill or experience that would be valuable to impoverished people who want to develop their communities?

Extras

Expand the Circle Locally

For more discussions of this material, check out these additional video clips with Artie Lindsay and other experienced leaders.

Expand the Circle Globally

About the Speakers

Amy Sherman

Dr. Amy L. Sherman is a senior fellow at the Sagamore Institute for Policy Research, where she directs the Center on Faith in Communities. In 2012, she was named by Christianity Today as one of the 50 most influential Evangelical women in America. She is the author of six books and over 80 articles in a variety of Christian and secular periodicals.

Amy’s most recent book, “Kingdom Calling: Vocational Stewardship for the Common Good,” seeks to help marketplace Christians live missionally, advancing foretastes of the kingdom of God through the strategic deployment of their vocational power.

Amy is a long-time member of Trinity Presbyterian Church in Charlottesville, Va. Her undergraduate degree is from Messiah College (1987) and her M.A. and Ph.D. are from the University of Virginia (1991, 1994).

Hear From This Speaker

Amy, a featured speaker, led four sessions for Part 2.

  • Video Clip 5: “Rejoicing the City”
  • Video Clip 6: “Why Does Righteousness Really Look Like?”
  • Video Clip 7: “What is Vocational Stewardship?”
  • Video Clip 8: “The Pathways of Vocational Stewardship”

Artie Lindsay

Pastor Artie Lindsay serves as teaching pastor at Tabernacle Community Church, a multiethnic congregation in Grand Rapids, Mich. Artie was one of the lead architects in establishing the church. He earned a B.A. in political science from the University of Michigan before following God’s call into pastoral ministry. He moved from his hometown of Detroit to Grand Rapids, in the fall of 1995 to complete an M.T.S. at Grand Rapids Theological Seminary.

Prior to establishing Tabernacle Community Church, Artie served as the associate pastor at Messiah Baptist Church in Grand Rapids from 1997-2002 under the leadership of Dr. Clifton Rhodes, Jr. Artie has a burden and passion for community revitalization, and he continues to work extensively in the community to address the very real physical, emotional and spiritual needs of community members.

Artie is married to Raquel, and they have three children, AJ, Victoria and Alysa.

Hear From This Speaker

Artie, a featured speaker, led two of the four sessions for Part 4.

  • Video Clip 13: “How Do You View Poverty?”
  • Video Clip 14: “How Will You Approach Poverty?”

Darrell Yoder

Darrell Yoder has been serving in pastoral ministry since 2009 and is currently a program director and adjunct professor at Grand Rapids Theological Seminary. He earned a B.A. from Liberty University and a M.Div. from Grand Rapids Theological Seminary.

At GRTS, Darrell gives leadership to the Talking Points program, which provides resources and events for pastors, ministry leaders and counselors. He also leads two scholarship programs for Master of Divinity students, the Pirsig Fellowship and the Kern Scholars Program, where he provides spiritual retreats and oversees small groups that seek to cultivate students’ personal spiritual formation.

Outside of GRTS, Darrell serves as a lay pastor at his home church and as the director of the Evangelical Seminary Deans’ Council, a professional development network of evangelical seminary deans.

Darrell and his wife live with their three children in Rockford, Mich.

Hear From This Moderator

Darrell served as the panel moderator for Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4.

  • Part 1: Panel Discussion 1 and Panel Discussion 2
  • Part 2: Panel Discussion 1 and Panel Discussion 2
  • Part 3: Panel Discussion 1 and Panel Discussion 2
  • Part 4: Panel Discussion 1 and Panel Discussion 2

George Moss

George Moss is a hip hop musician, speaker and entrepreneur. He has released two studio albums with Dreamlight Entertainment, “All or Nothing” (2008) and “It’s Time” (2012). Through his music, George boldly declares, “I wasn’t called to make fans. I was called to make disciples.”

Out of this commitment to his faith, George launched OXEN Apparel and OXEN Team Ministries, a discipleship program for students and leaders to discover what it means to be branded, trained and yoked to Jesus Christ.

George provided his talent and experience to the Everyday Works intro videos, and his life is an example of stewarding your everyday work for the kingdom of God.

Hear From This Narrator

  • Part 1: “Doesn’t This Change Everything?”
  • Part 2: “You Have More to Offer Thank You Think”
  • Part 3: “You’re Part of Something Huge”
  • Part 4: “We Are Called to Compassion and Justice”

Luke Bobo

Dr. Luke Bobo serves as director of resource and curriculum development for the Made To Flourish Pastors’ Network (Oakland Park, Kan.), providing leadership to create and curate resources and curriculum for pastors in that network.

Luke has a rich blend of experience. He worked for 15 years in the marketplace as an engineer before pursuing an M.Div. and Ph.D., serving as the executive director of the Francis Schaeffer Institute at Covenant Seminary. Luke has also spent time as professor of religious studies at Lindenwood University, adjunct professor of religious studies at the University of Kansas and of culture and apologetics at Covenant Seminary.

Luke has written curriculum for a workplace ministry and is the author of several books, including “Living Salty and Light Filled Lives in the Workplace” and “A Layperson’s Guide to Biblical Interpretation: A Means to Know the Personal God.”

Hear From This Panelist

Luke, a panelist, appeared in the panel discussions for Part 4.

  • Part 4: Panel Discussion 1 and Panel Discussion 2

Matt Zainea

Pastor Matt Zainea is the lead pastor at Blythefield Hills Baptist Church in Rockford, Mich., where he has served since 1997. Before entering pastoral ministry, Matt worked in the banking industry for over a decade. He earned a B.A. in Finance from Michigan State University, an M.B.A. from the University of Notre Dame and an M.T.S. in Historical Theology from Grand Rapids Theological Seminary.

Matt and his wife, Lesley, have six children. Matt enjoys reading, gardening and basketball.

Hear From This Panelist

Matt, a panelist, appeared in the panel discussions for Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3.

  • Part 1: Panel Discussion 1 and Panel Discussion 2
  • Part 2: Panel Discussion 1 and Panel Discussion 2
  • Part 3: Panel Discussion 1 and Panel Discussion 2

Michael Wittmer

Dr. Michael Wittmer serves as professor of systematic and historical theology (1996 to present) and director of the Center for Christian Worldview at Grand Rapids Theological Seminary (2003 to present). He earned a B.A. at Cedarville University, an M.Div. and Th.M. from Grand Rapids Theological Seminary and a Ph.D. from Calvin Theological Seminary.

In addition to teaching, Mike preaches regularly as pulpit supply and is an avid writer, blogging at mikewittmer.wordpress.com. He has written several theological books for the Church, including “Becoming Worldly Saints,” “Despite Doubt,” “The Last Enemy,” “Don’t Stop Believing,” and “Heaven is a Place on Earth.”

He lives in Rockford, Mich., with his wife Julie and their three children.

Hear From This Speaker

Mike, a featured speaker, led four sessions for Part 1.

  • Video Clip 1: “Creation is Good” with Mike Wittmer
  • Video Clip 2: “Creation is Home” with Mike Wittmer
  • Video Clip 3: “Called to Love and Serve” with Mike Wittmer
  • Video Clip 4: “Called to Work and Rest” with Mike Wittmer

Peter Greer

Peter Greer is the president and CEO of HOPE International. He joined HOPE in 2004 following experience serving in microfinance organizations in multiple places around the world. Greer served as managing director for Urwego, a Christ-centered microfinance institution in Kigali, Rwanda, and as a technical adviser for Self Help Development Foundation in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. He also has experience working as a microfinance adviser in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

Greer is the co-author of several books, including “Created To Flourish,” “The Spiritual Danger of Doing Good,” “Mission Drift,” “Entrepreneurship for Human Flourishing” and “Watching Seeds Grow” (co-authored with his son, Keith).

He holds a Master in Public Policy from Harvard’s Kennedy School and an honorary doctorate from Erskine College.

Peter and his wife, Laurel, live in Lancaster, Pa., with their three children.

Hear From This Speaker

Peter, a featured speaker, led two of the four sessions for Part 4.

  • Video Clip 15: “Our Super Hero Complex”
  • Video Clip 16: “Flip the List! Rethinking Our Approach to International Poverty”

Rachel Hammond

Rachel Hammond serves as assistant professor of business at Cornerstone University in Grand Rapids, Mich. She graduated with a B.A. in Communication Arts from Cornerstone University in 1999, and in 2002, she earned her Master of Management from Aquinas College while working in the banking industry as a corporate trainer and HRD manager.

Rachel teaches Principles of Management, Business Communications, Project Management and other management-related courses. She also serves as a co-faculty adviser for Cornerstone’s Enactus team.

In her free time, Rachel enjoys spending time with her family, serving at her church, reading and joining the occasional urban adventure race. She is one of the editors for Mom Colored Glasses, a website for moms that provides both information and inspiration on a variety of mom-focused topics.

Hear From This Panelist

Rachel, a panelist, appeared in the panel discussions for Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4.

  • Part 1: Panel Discussion 1 and Panel Discussion 2
  • Part 2: Panel Discussion 1 and Panel Discussion 2
  • Part 3: Panel Discussion 1 and Panel Discussion 2
  • Part 4: Panel Discussion 1 and Panel Discussion 2

Rudy Carrasco

Rudy Carrasco is the U.S. regional facilitator for Partners Worldwide, an organization in Grand Rapids, Mich., which uses business, enterprise and entrepreneurship to create flourishing economic environments in all parts of the world. He is also a writer, minister and advocate for Christian Community Development.

Since graduating from Stanford University with a B.A. in English, Rudy has focused on indigenous leadership development. A writer by training, his articles have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Christianity Today, Religion News Service and other publications, and he lectures regularly for the Acton Institute (Grand Rapids, Mich.).

In 2001, he joined a group of nine Hispanic religious leaders who advised President George W. Bush on faith-based initiatives. He serves on the board of directors of World Vision US and TechMission and on the advisory board of the Christian Community Development Association.

He lives with his family in Grand Rapids, Mich.

Hear From This Speaker

Rudy, a featured speaker, led four sessions for Part 3.

  • Video Clip 9: “People Serving People”
  • Video Clip 10: “What the Bible Says”
  • Video Clip 11: “Wrong Decision Makers”
  • Video Clip 12: “Broken Relationships”

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